A Guide to Registration (Page 2 of 7)

2. Categories of Lobbyists

The Lobbying Act provides for two categories of lobbyists: Consultants and In-House Lobbyists.

2.1 Consultant Lobbyists

Consultant lobbyists include any individual who is paid to communicate with public office holders on behalf of a client. A consultant lobbyist may not be primarily engaged to lobby. It could be any individual who, in the course of his or her work on behalf of a client, communicates with or arranges a meeting with a public office holder. For example, lawyers, accountants and other professionals may lobby as a portion of the services they provide. Consultant lobbyists are required to submit separate registrations for each of their clients.

Note
Because they are not employees, remunerated external members of Boards of Directors who lobby on behalf of an organization or corporation for which they are Directors, cannot register as in-house lobbyists. The same rule applies to members of organizations who are paid to lobby on behalf of those same organizations. They must instead register as consultant lobbyists within 10 days of accepting, verbally or in writing, to lobby on behalf of the organization or corporation. See Advisory Opinion on Application of the Act to outside chairpersons and members.

2.2 In-House Lobbyists

In-house lobbyists communicate with public office holders on behalf of the corporation or the organization that employs them. Registration is required when one or more employees communicate with public office holders regarding certain subjects and those duties constitute a significant part of the duties of one employee or would constitute a significant part of the duties of one employee if they were performed by only one employee.

Note
You will have to determine which category of lobbyist you belong to in order to register in the correct category in the Lobbyists Registration System (LRS).